About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
the price in europe, japan, or elsewhere. host: and emory, dallas, texas, good morning. -- and memory, dallas, texas, good morning. -- anna marie, dallas, texas, good morning. caller: what can we do as a community to prepare? what are some things that we can do to perhaps -- me and a group of others -- we could create a project for awareness? guest: a great project for awareness is awareness about the distribution grid at the local level. in my area, washington, d.c., the utility for a variety of reasons and did not trim trees for decades. people complained because they were cutting trees and not want them on their property, so for the last few years with storms we have had an enormous amount of free-fall, branches, and so on. putting pressure on the utilities, running public projects, schools, so on, identifying areas that are vulnerable where a tree trimming process, and again, i am an environmentalist, i am not saying to cut down trees indiscriminately, but i am saying that there is a trade- off and if you do not do the maintenance at the local community level, there will be severe
running into the convention. the front page of the "dallas morning news," or the "fort worth star-telegram," "g.o.p. shifts on immigration." the dallas morning news -- it was amaze together see, that, wow, we're going to come in here and label them as antianything, and it was a total different route. then some people came to me and some friends of mine said we've got to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement on the national republican platform, which was great. thought my work was over. election day hits and wednesday my phone starts getting blown up again. it's time to get back in the debate again. we need to start doing more, we need to start talking about this. you know, i believe free-market solutions are a part of this. i believe in strong border security. the anti-immigration groups will try to label us as open borders, big business wants cheap labor. i can tell you, if we can fund blackwater security forces in iraq or some type of security force that is licensed and
-mail or allowing people to vote in districts where they do not live, provisional bots. -- dallas. -- provisional ballots. i do not know that it is more democrats than republicans. i suppose, it could drive down the popular vote for obama nationally, but i don't know that it will necessarily do that in any of the states that were hit. host: kristie from tennessee. caller: we all know as americans, whether we are democratic or republican to run a health care reform is very important. i am a political science major at my state college. i know a little bit about the dynamics of how politics works on an elementary level. you say in your article that obama and the next four years would be willing to cut deals with republicans, possibly. why if he was elected in 2008, why didn't you listen to the voices in congress on the republican side, and why did he pushed through a health care reform act that all of us as americans feel so strongly about? it would have been so nice if he had chosen by partition chip -- bipartisanship then and we would not be in a stalemate. of americans, a lot do like obamacare. i
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
. he spoke to supporters in dallas that year. >> wait just a minute. the first thing we want to do, we will be talking about this in a minute. the first thing we want to do is to team up together and make it work now, right? absolutely. you are not too happy, we can make some changes in 1994, right? the main thing now, time is precious. let's try to make it work. texas working together to make it work. i will be talking about that in a minute. we have worked to starting right away. our country needs all of our help. [applause] i want to thank all of you are here tonight and all the people who have come here together across the nation. starting last february, you did something that everybody said could not be done. millions of you came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you f
response. guest: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but it has always been with us. going back to 1876, that was an interesting election. he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings b
. lone gunman, the mob, ca, castro, the military-industrial complex? what happened in dallas? >> leading economists and political scholars discussed the economy and the so-called fiscal cliff at an event hosted by economists for peace and security and the new american foundation's program. this is about 90 minutes. >> good morning. i am the chair of economists for peace and security. i'd like to welcome you to this symposium. entitled "who's afraid of the fiscal cliff?" the eps is an organization of professional economists concerned with questions of military security, national security, economic security, social security, with the broad question that we have been grappling with intensely for the last four or five years. we are not an advocacy for lobbying groups. we gather together professionals working on this question to represent only themselves -- who represent only themselves and have the advantage of being able to speak to you with clarity and conviction. eps is also a membership organization. our web site is www.epsusa.org. i would invite all of you here and all who may be wantin
house, he jumps out of airplanes, he goes back and forth to dallas every weekend. and the question, ralph, that all of us want to know is what kind of vitamins are you taking? because we all want to be on whatever diet that you're on. but what i wanted to say about ralph tonight is, you know, i don't -- ralph is a congressman to many people and the people in rockwall. but to all of us, ralph hall is our friend. and we're very proud of our friend and we're very proud to have the opportunity to serve with a great man like ralph hall. my ralph hall story is we were celebrating one of his birthdays on a thursday, the texas republican delegation has lunch every thursday and somebody brought a birthday cake in, they brought the cake in and i think we had a candle there and we just had one to kind of commemorate all of the years, the fire marshall wouldn't let us bring all the rest of them, sorry, ralph. but he was making light of his birthday and he looked at us and said, you know what the worst thing that somebody can say to you on your birthday? is don't you look natural? but what we k
happened in dallas? the assassination of john f. kennedy sunday at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> more now on the congressional investigation into the meningitis outbreak from today's "washington journal" and is about 35 minutes. host: joining us now is anna edney, who reports on the fda and other issues for bloomberg news. this issue stemmed from what is known as a compound in pharmacy. can you give us a history of what this is about? guest: they are looking to see if this could have been prevented. the pharmacy has been around since 1998, 1999, and there have been complaints from other states, basically since about a year from when it started. lawmakers were trying to figure out if more could have been done in the state of massachusetts, or if the food and drug administration could have been investigating it more apparent maybe it could have or should have been -- more. maybe it could have or should have been shut down. they are asking the massachusetts officials and the food and drug administration whether they were doing enough. the question is whether they were doing compounding,
was around dallas because of budget cuts. remember, this is a disease spread by mosquitoes. texas has no entomologist anymore. they cut the position because they ran out of money. >> for over a century, the u.s. fire service had the task of extinguishing any fire that was started on federal land. that wound up with a situation where we have these huge, hot, devastating forest fires in the modern era. is our public health policy doing something similar? >> is an interesting metaphor, but i do not know if it is completely transferable. >> what about the trend in decline of vaccination. another colleague wrote a book called the panic virus. he talked about the virus spread of belief that vaccinations make people sick, especially children. vaccinations cause autism, among other things. a lot of science shows that is a false concern, but it has led to a serious decline of rates of vaccination in children in some areas. >> let's not completely step away from the point that was just made. it is an interesting idea. there is another way of looking at that, and this is that there has been an i
on "american history tv close-" questions remain. lone gunman, the mob, the military -- what happened in dallas? the assassination of john kennedy at 730 p.m. president obama traveled to the new york city area to assess damage from hurricane sandy. on staten island, he visited a recovery center. he was joined by new york city mayor michael bloomberg, homeland security secretary janet napolitano, and others. >> good afternoon, on behalf of all new yorkers, mr. president, it is an honor to welcome you here to our city. we are here with our two great senators, and the governor and i wanted to particularly thank you and particularly thank all the volunteers who have worked so hard for the last two weeks. 24/7 a lot of them, they have made all the difference. we are getting out of this. we are getting ahead. we did lose 23 staten islanders here, one was police officer artur, whose funeral i went to. someone unfortunately this city will miss. we are making our ways back. mr. president, thank you particularly for all the help we have gotten from fema, from homeland secretary napolitano who is with us,
into the convention. the front page of the "dallas morning news," or "fort worth star-telegram," "gop shifts on immigration." it was amazing to see that we were going to come in here and label them anti-hispanic, anti- anything, and it was a total different route. some friends of mine said that we need to take this to the national level. we went to the national platform in tampa and started talking about it. we got a national guest worker endorsement of the national convention platform, which was great. election day hits, and on wednesday by phone starts getting blown up again, that it is time to, that we need to start talking more about this. i believe that free-market solutions are part of this. i believe in strong border security. anti-immigration groups try to label us open borders, big business, wants cheap labor. if we could fund blackwater security forces in iraq, we need to do that. in texas, i have been down firsthand to see the devastating effect it has on property owners, on everything. we need to look at every option available. it is in our national security to do so. i am not fo
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12